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Lateral Meningocele Syndrome

What is Lateral Meningocele Syndrome?

Lateral Meningocele Syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple lateral meningoceles (meninges protrude from a spinal opening).

 

Lateral Meningocele Syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple lateral meningoceles (meninges protrude from a spinal opening).
Acknowledgement of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Prevalence Information of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Synonyms for Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Cause of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Symptoms for Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Diagnosis of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Diagnostic tests of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet
Treatments of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Prognosis of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Tips or Suggestions of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
References of Lateral Meningocele Syndrome has not been added yet.
Facebook page for Lateral Meningocele Syndrome Created by Vhare85
Last updated 18 Aug 2017, 04:16 PM

Posted by Vhare85
18 Aug 2017, 04:16 PM

Please help spread the word about our new page, Living with Lateral Meningocele Syndrome, specifically for Lateral Meningocele Syndrome. This syndrome is so rare there are less that 20 (as far as we can tell) diagnosed with this syndrome. We know what it is like to desperately search for a diagnosis and fight an almost unknown battle for our child. There are many people going undiagnosed for years or suffering alone in silence. If we could help just one person or family find what they are looking for, all the hard work out into this page will be worth it. Thank you and much love to you all! Here is a link to our page https://m.facebook.com/living.with.LMS/?ref=bookmarks

Lateral Meningocele Syndrome Created by jennifer0905
Last updated 17 Aug 2017, 05:11 AM

Posted by Vhare85
17 Aug 2017, 05:09 AM

My daughter will be 3 in October and has lateral meningocele syndrome. The prognosis is good in general. I considered it a win compared to some if the other syndromes she could have had... Definitely Google Lateral Meningocele Syndrome. Here is a link to an article my daughter's neurosurgeon helped write about my daughter http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2016.9.PEDS16311?journalCode=ped.1 

We would love to hear from anyone who might have or know someone who has this very rare syndrome. As far as I know, there are less than 20 people in the world with it.

Posted by grandma1950
11 Aug 2015, 03:39 AM

My 3 year old grandson has just been diagnosed with LMS. There is so little information. I can't find any prognosis or what to expect in the future.

Posted by jennifer0905
13 Jul 2012, 12:48 PM

Does anyone out there have this syndrome or know of someone who does.

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Visit sanfordresearch.org/CoRDS to enroll.

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Facebook page for Lateral Meningocele Syndrome

Created by Vhare85 | Last updated 18 Aug 2017, 04:16 PM

Lateral Meningocele Syndrome

Created by jennifer0905 | Last updated 17 Aug 2017, 05:11 AM


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