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X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

What is X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness?

X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness is a rare genetic non-progressive retinal disorder.

 

X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness is a rare genetic non-progressive retinal disorder.
Acknowledgement of X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet.
Prevalence Information of X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet.
Synonyms for X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet.
Genetic
Rods and cones in the eye are affected. Side effects are myopia (short sighted) and possible nystagmus as well as possible strabismus.
Diagnosis of X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet.
Diagnostic tests of X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet
Treatments of X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet.
Prognosis of X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet.
Tips or Suggestions of X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet.
References of X-linked Congenital Stationary Night Blindness has not been added yet.
Living with CSNB Created by Antg94
Last updated 19 Oct 2011, 03:07 AM

Posted by moonhump
19 Oct 2011, 03:07 AM

Thanks so much. I will e-mail you there in the next day or two.

Posted by Antg94
16 Oct 2011, 12:52 PM

you can contact me through my new website http://www.vision-forums.moonfruit.com/# hope i can be of some help

Posted by moonhump
14 Oct 2011, 03:13 AM

Thank you so much. How do I reach you to talk with you. You are the only person in the world who has responded to this request, and I am thankful. Please let me know how to reach you. If you prefer to talk online I understand. My little boy is almost 3 and I need to see how this is going to affect all of our lives. More importantly how is this going to impact him? What do we take for granted that he cannot do? What can we do to help or encourage him? His prescription for short sightedness is pretty significant but he does really well with his glasses. Of course I have a million questions so any insight would be helpful. Looking forward to hearing from you.

View Full Thread (1 more posts)
Looking for families with experience with this please Created by moonhump
Last updated 14 Oct 2011, 03:32 AM

Posted by moonhump
14 Oct 2011, 03:32 AM

Thanks Anthony. this is really helpful. My little boy has Nystagmus as well. This is pretty common from what I understand. Does it feel uncomfortable or do you not even know that it is happening? I am thrilled to hear that you are doing so well. Good for you that you just get on with what needs to happen in life. I am feeling better after you sharing this info. I do however want to understand what it is like to not have peripheral vision and what it was like going to school when you were younger. Was there anything that you had to do to help in the classroom enviroment. I am assuming that you went to public school. How were the other kids with you? I never thought about dealing with traffic during the day - just assumed it was a low light issue. It is hard to know at this point what my son sees as he is so small and describing it to me is too hard.. His vision prescription is -12 and climbing. Not trying to be nosy but how is yours? both of his eyes are the same. Is yours much higher? What do you see when you are not wearing your glasses? I know that he has peripheral vision issues as he has to turn his head to see things and just like you, ball sports are not his thing. This is a small price to pay as far as I am concerned. As for taking a taxi - good that you have this option. Here in the USA things are spread out so far and taxis are not as prolific. We will cross that bridge when we get to it. Thank you so much for sharing. I hope that the questions are not too personal. I just want to help him anyway I can. You have done an amazing thing by sharing this info with us. Curious where in the UK you are. My aunt lives just north of London.

Posted by Antg94
22 Sep 2011, 12:37 PM

Hi i was diagnosed with CSNB at the age of 3 months. It is not a progressive disorder and doesn't usually get worse or better. However different aspects can make the condition seem worse. I have short sightedness (that was worse when I was younger). I have a condition called Nystagmus which causes the eye to move around. The Nystagmus in my eyes has slowed down as i have got older. I also have low field vision which means I can only see directly to the front and i have to move my head left to right to see in other directions. I am 17 now and I am studying at college. Schooling isn't a problem as schools have Learning support teams which help with adapting and enlarging of work. However there are some things that i can't do. These include gaining a driving licence, working for any of the emergency services and various other professions, playing ball games (as my head kept on being hit by balls i couldn't see) and getting around on my own (epesially in the evenings and at night). I also can't read small text. I get a taxi to college everyday and I had one through school too. this was because my mobility skills are not brilliant and i find it difficult to deal with traffic. I get tired a lot because my brain tries to compensate for the loss of vision in the eye. It also takes me a long time to read. apart from that there are just small adaptations to day to day living such as leaving a light on in the evenings and sitting close to the television screen. If you have anymore questions please don't hesitate to ask. I hope what i've said will help Anthony

Posted by moonhump
1 May 2011, 06:56 PM

My little boy is 2 years old. He was diagnosed at 6 months with csnb and I am looking for anyone to talk about the progession as well as what we are/could be expecting to change as he grows. His myopia (short sighted) has gotten worse within the last year. If you have any info for me if you or a family member or friend has this I would appreciate you getting in touch with me. It is really hard to find non scientific info. We just want to know what it is like for our little boy. THANK YOU!

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Living with CSNB

Created by Antg94 | Last updated 19 Oct 2011, 03:07 AM

Looking for families with experience with this please

Created by moonhump | Last updated 14 Oct 2011, 03:32 AM


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