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Jejunal Atresia

What is Jejunal Atresia ?

Jejunal Atresia is a rare genetic disorder caused by the partial absence of the fold of the stomach membrane that connects the small intestine to the back wall of the abdomen resulting in the jejunal twisting around an artery of the colon.

 

 

Jejunal Atresia is a rare genetic disorder caused by the partial absence of the fold of the stomach membrane that connects the small intestine to the back wall of the abdomen resulting in the jejunal twisting around an artery of the colon.

 

Acknowledgement of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
Prevalence Information of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
Synonyms for Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
Cause of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
Symptoms include vomiting, a swollen abdomen, and constipation.
Diagnosis of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
Diagnostic tests of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet
Treatments of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
Prognosis of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
Tips or Suggestions of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
References of Jejunal Atresia has not been added yet.
Living with a rare disorder Created by heather0879
Last updated 4 Feb 2016, 04:28 AM

Posted by deidre23
4 Feb 2016, 04:28 AM

Hi Nathaliesayers, My daughter who just turned 5 about a month ago was born at 32 weeks due to jejunal astresia. She has surgery the day after she was born and hasn't had any problems ever since ( knock on wood). I am not sure if she will have any problems as she gets older but as of right now, she is s picky eater, which is probably typical at her age. You may email me at deidrehunt1@gmail.com, if you have any questions or would like to chat.

Posted by Alexdido
3 Feb 2016, 10:46 PM

Hi Nathaliesayers, I just saw your message. I am sorry that nobody replied to it and I just wanted to tell you that if you still need to talk, you can contact me at alexdido23@ gmail.com I hope you got some answers regarding your little boy's symptoms. One thing is for sure, don't always listen to what your doctors say, follow your instincts as docs don't know everything. I would love to share my experience with you too. I still struggle a lot with my 21 months old girl who was born at 32 weeks with jejunal atrasia and had 1/3 of her gut removed. She does not suffer from constipation but vomits all the time (sometimes twice a day) almost everyday. She also suffers from reflux and It breaks my heart to hear her every night moaning with pain. Anyway, if you read me, please get in touch x

Posted by Nataliesayers
25 Nov 2015, 09:56 PM

Hi I'm sorry I have just found this and I'm not sure anyone is still around and using this site but I'm a pretty desperate mum so I'm going to ask anyway.....my son is three and born with jejunal atresia. Surgically repaired at 3 days old. He is dairy and soya intolerant so diet is restricted. He is currently having a lot of trouble going to the toilet. He's on three different laxatives, but the doctors are saying it's not related. He's constantly crying he needs to go but just can't. It takes days. He says he tummy is "big". He also has development delay and they are looking into autism so I feel they are shrugging it off as a behaviour thing. I've been told from his doctors that basically you either get short gut syndrome from the surgery or your fine. There is no in between.... So I guess I'm asking if you think I'm just a paranoid mum or if he really could be having effects from the atresia. As you can imagine it's not been easy finding other mums or anyone for that matter who even knows what this is to ask! So I hope someone is still here :/

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Living with a rare disorder

Created by heather0879 | Last updated 4 Feb 2016, 04:28 AM


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