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Eosinophilic Disease

What is Eosinophilic Disease?

Eosinophilic disease is a rare disorder in which elevated amounts of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, are found in one or more parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Eosinophils are involved in regulating allergic and immune response reactions. When the body produces too many eosinophils, it causes inflammation in the surrounding areas and leads to tissue damage. Also, the digestive system may display abnormal function, such as dyspepsia, obstruction, diarrhea or ascites production.

 

Eosinophilic disease is diagnosed and/or defined by where the elevated levels of eosinophils are located.

  • Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) affects the esophagus
  • Eosinophilic gastritis (EG) affects the stomach
  • Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) affects the stomach and small intestine
  • Eosinophilic enteritis  affects the small intestine
  • Eosinophilic colitis (EC) affects the large intestine
  • Hyper-eosinophilic syndrome (HES) affects the blood and/or other organs

 

Eosinophilic disease is a rare disorder in which elevated amounts of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, are found in one or more parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Eosinophils are involved in regulating allergic and immune response reactions. When the body produces too many eosinophils, it causes inflammation in the surrounding areas and leads to tissue damage. Also, the digestive system may display abnormal function, such as dyspepsia, obstruction, diarrhea or ascites production.

 

Eosinophilic disease is diagnosed and/or defined by where the elevated levels of eosinophils are located.

  • Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) affects the esophagus
  • Eosinophilic gastritis (EG) affects the stomach
  • Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) affects the stomach and small intestine
  • Eosinophilic enteritis  affects the small intestine
  • Eosinophilic colitis (EC) affects the large intestine
  • Hyper-eosinophilic syndrome (HES) affects the blood and/or other organs
Acknowledgement of Eosinophilic Disease has not been added yet.

EoE affects about 1 out of 2,000 individuals and EG affects about 1 in 10,000. Both are more prevalent in men. Age prevalence is 20-50 years.

Eosinophilic disease individuals have other allergy related diseases, such as, rhinitis, asthma, or eczema.

Some families show a genetic inheritance patterns in developing EoE.

 

Synonyms for Eosinophilic Disease has not been added yet.

The cause of eosinophilic disease is unknown.

In Eoe, it is believed that affected individuals have food or environmental allergies that triggers an immune response to specific foods. The gene CAPN14 can play a role in EoE and is expressed primarily in the esophagus.

 

The symptoms of eosinophilic disease varies from one individual to another, some common ones include:

  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphasia)
  • Nausea/ vomiting
  • Gastro reflux or heartburn
  • Abdominal pain
  • Poor weight or difficulty to gain weight
  • Diarrhea
  • Bloating
  • Ascites

Narrowing of the esophagus which cause food to become stuck or impacted; it may lead to a medical emergency at times.

Specific symptoms depend on where eosinophilic reactions are occurring. The most common area is the stomach and small intestine. If it involves the muscle layers, it can lead to malabsorption, abdominal pain, vomiting, or bowel obstruction. If it involves the inner layers, it can cause ascites or pleural effusion.

 

Most affected individuals have elevated levels of IgE, a class of antibodies involved in allergic reactions, and eosinophils in their tissue and blood. Eosinophilic disease is diagnosed by a biopsy. A biopsy is the only method of diagnosis that can distinguish eosinophilic disease from other digestive disorders. If a diagnosis is confirmed, allergy testing is essential to help guide therapy and treatment.

 

  • Biopsy
  • Allergy test
  • Blood level of IgE and eosinophils

 

The treatment of eosinophilic disease is medical and/or dietary therapy. There are medications available to control eosinophils in the different parts of the body.

  • The treatment for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is topical steroids (e.g., steroid inhaler) and dietary therapy. Esophageal dilation can help relieve dysphagia; the most common symptom of EoE. Proton Pump Inhibitors can help with acid-associated esophagitis or acid reflux disease.
  • The treatment for eosinophilic gastritis (EG) is systemic steroids. Dietary therapy is less effective.
  • The treatment for eosinophilic colitis (EC) is systemic steroids. Dietary therapy is less effective
  • The treatment for eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is systemic steroids. Dietary therapy is less effective.
  • The treatment for hyper-eosinophilic syndrome (HES) is systemic steroids or biological agents (i.e., imatinib). Dietary therapy is not a treatment option in HES.

The common dietary therapies are:

  • Elemental diet uses of amino acids to aid digestion.
  • A six-food elimination diet that avoids foods containing the six most common dietary antigens in the United States, i.e. milk, soy, wheat, eggs, fish/shellfish, and peanuts/tree nuts, regardless of allergy test results.
  • Allergy testing helps determine dietary restrictions of foods that can trigger the disease.

 

Eosinophilic disease is life long and there is currently no cure. Adhering to medication and/or dietary therapy can aid help prognosis.

EoE is a chronic disease but does not limit life expectancy. With the proper treatment, affected individuals can have a normal life.

 

Tips or Suggestions of Eosinophilic Disease has not been added yet.
Terminal Illness Created by kathyk
Last updated 28 Feb 2011, 07:44 PM

Posted by kathyk
28 Feb 2011, 07:44 PM

My daughter was diagnosed with eosinophilic gastroenteritis when she was 16 years old. She passed away last March at the age of 27. The disease quickly overwhelmed her and she died from a retroperitoneal hemorrhage. The doctors she had seen during the weeks prior to her death didn't have a clue.

Sharing Information Created by AndrewsMommy
Last updated 1 Mar 2010, 10:45 AM

Posted by AndrewsMommy
1 Mar 2010, 10:45 AM

My 2 year old son was diagnosed with Eosinophilic Esophagitis in January 2009. He is continuing to get worse and I feel like the drs aren't treating him aggressively enough or fast enough. I'm seeking opinions/advice/comments from those who deal with this on a day-to-day basis- patients and parents. Thanks in advance. Hugs~ Casey

HES Created by reallife65
Last updated 3 Jun 2009, 05:18 PM

Posted by reallife65
3 Jun 2009, 05:18 PM

Hi, I'm new to online discussion and looking to chat w/ others who have HES and what treatments have worked etc. Looking to be a support and find support as well. Have a blessed day.

Information about a new clinical trial being conducted Created by valerieitkin
Last updated 19 Mar 2009, 02:49 PM

Posted by valerieitkin
19 Mar 2009, 02:49 PM

Some people in this community might be interested in a clinical trial in pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis patients to study Oral Viscous Budesonide (OVB) being conducted. This trial is evaluating the safety and efficacy of OVB in children and adolescents and is being conducted at multiple centers of excellence in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases in the U.S. This study, which has a 12-week treatment period, includes patients 2 to 18 years of age and is evaluating three different doses of OVB versus an inactive medicine. The study is measuring each patient’s response to therapy by measuring the number of eosinophils in the esophagus before and after OVB administration, as well as evaluating the changes in the patients’ symptoms. Budesonide has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treating asthma and other diseases in children and adults. The oral formulation of budesonide being used in the clinical study is designed to deliver budesonide to the esophagus and is intended to treat local eosinophilic inflammation and associated symptoms. More information about the trial can be found: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00762073?term=Meritage&rank=2 or by consulting your physician.

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Terminal Illness

Created by kathyk | Last updated 28 Feb 2011, 07:44 PM

Sharing Information

Created by AndrewsMommy | Last updated 1 Mar 2010, 10:45 AM

HES

Created by reallife65 | Last updated 3 Jun 2009, 05:18 PM

Information about a new clinical trial being conducted

Created by valerieitkin | Last updated 19 Mar 2009, 02:49 PM


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