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Alopecia Totalis

What is Alopecia Totalis?

Alopecia Totalis (AT) is a condition characterized by the complete loss of hair on the scalp. It is considered to be an advanced form of Alopecia Areata (AA), a condition resulting in round patches of hair loss on the scalp and other areas of the body that grow hair. While the exact cause of AT is unknown, it is thought to be an autoimmune condition in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the hair follicles (the part of your skin that makes hair).

 

Alopecia Totalis (AT) is a condition characterized by the complete loss of hair on the scalp. It is considered to be an advanced form of Alopecia Areata (AA), a condition resulting in round patches of hair loss on the scalp and other areas of the body that grow hair. While the exact cause of AT is unknown, it is thought to be an autoimmune condition in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the hair follicles (the part of your skin that makes hair).

Acknowledgement of Alopecia Totalis has not been added yet.

AT can occur in people of all ages, sexes and ethnic groups. The exact prevalence of AT is unknown, but AA affects as many as 6.8 million people in the U.S.

Synonyms for Alopecia Totalis has not been added yet.

The specific cause of AT is unknown. However, it is understood that genetics play a role in the likelihood of someone developing AA. Around 20% of individuals with AA will have a family member also living with the condition. It is also more likely that those living with AA will have family members with other autoimmune or atopic conditions including asthma, eczema, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and thyroid disease.

The only noticeable symptom presented by patients with alopecia is hair loss.

Name Description
Hair Loss Hair Loss

A doctor or dermatologist will examine the area with hair loss ( with AT, the scalp) and ask some questions. This can in some cases be enough for a diagnosis of AT. However, as there are many reasons for hair loss, testing is often necessary to determine whether AA or in this case, AT is the only cause for the hair loss.

A blood test can look into the possibility of other factors resulting in hair loss, such as diseases concerning the immune system. In some cases, other tests may be performed.

There is currently no cure for AT, but in some cases, hair growth can occur on its own. Trying to treat AT can be challenging, as this is such an unpredictable disease. There are a number of treatment options that have been explored for AA and AT, but there is currently no FDA-approved therapy for AT. Common treatments for AA begin with a minimal approach with topical and injectable corticosteroids, and may then be followed by more extensive treatments with systemic immunomodulators (drugs that help regulate or normalize the body’s immune system).

The prognosis for AT varies across individuals and is very unpredictable. In some cases, hair regrowth can occur, but the chances of full hair regrowth become much smaller for AT or when AA has developed to AT. 

 

Tips or Suggestions of Alopecia Totalis has not been added yet.

American Academy of Dermatology Association. Alopecia Areata: Diagnosis and Treatment. 2020. Available from: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/hair-loss/types/alopecia/treatment

Alopecia UK. Types of Alopecia. 2018. Available from: https://www.alopecia.org.uk/pages/faqs/category/types-of-alopecia.

Alshahrani, A. A. et al. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Alopecia Areata at a Tertiary Care Center in Saudi Arabia. Dermatology Research and Practice. 2020. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/7194270 

Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center. Alopecia Totalis. 2014. Available from: https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/613/alopecia-totalis#ref_7603

Jang, Y.H., et al. Long-Term Prognosis of Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis: A Longitudinal Study with More than 10 Years of Follow-Up: Better than Reported. Dermatology. 2017. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1159/000477458 

Kassira, S., Korta, D. Z., Chapman, L. W. & Dann, F. Review of treatment for alopecia totalis and alopecia universalis. International Journal of Dermatology. April 2017. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1111/ijd.13612.

National Organization of Rare Disorders. Alopecia Areata. 2020. Available from: https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/alopecia-areata/

Community Details Update Created by RareshareTeam
Last updated 25 Jun 2020, 01:57 AM

Posted by RareshareTeam
25 Jun 2020, 01:57 AM

Hi everyone,

The Alopecia Totalis community details have been updated. We added more information about the cause, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Hopefully, you find it helpful! 

Approved medicine from Japan to treat Alopecia May also Help Treat Coronavirus Created by Felicity1980
Last updated 8 Mar 2020, 07:23 AM

Posted by Felicity1980
8 Mar 2020, 07:23 AM

Hi Everyone,

I came across the following article which I found really interesting because it seems that Cepharanthine, a medication which is approved in Japan to treat various types of alopecia is now also showing potential in the prevention and treatment of Coronavirus.  Really fascinating!

The following report discusses Cepharanthine's effects on Alopecia, You can read this article to learn about the research on how Cepharanthine may also help with Coronavirus.

I would be happy to hear everyone's thoughts!  Thanks all!

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Visit sanfordresearch.org/CoRDS to enroll.

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I began losing my hair 9 months ago. Within 6 weeks I had lost all body hair. I have been diagnosed with Alopecia Universalis. I am a 73 year old female. None of the doctors in the area have any...
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I am 41 years old and have had Alopecia since I was about 11 years old. I had about 20 years of the on again, off again hair loss and and about a year after having my first child, I completely lost...

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Community Details Update

Created by RareshareTeam | Last updated 25 Jun 2020, 01:57 AM


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